Time to spend all my money or just some? Setup advice

Discussion in 'Alpine Touring Gear' started by raynord22, May 6, 2015.

  1. PowderPanda

    PowderPanda Staff Member

    Location:
    Liberty Lake, WA
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  2. raynord22

    raynord22

    Location:
    Sandpoint
    Thanks, The Vario versatility looks awesome, the plan is of course refills would only be for the yearly test fire. I've spent a ton on everything else so the price on this final piece is the current sticking point.
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  3. PowderPanda

    PowderPanda Staff Member

    Location:
    Liberty Lake, WA
    Totally understand Devin! You can always buy now, sell later and get something else.. Summer is the best time to buy one anyway!!
    raynord22 likes this.
  4. raynord22

    raynord22

    Location:
    Sandpoint
    Yeah right on, steepandcheap has bca float 32 plus canister for under $500 which I might hop on for a year or two. I like the jetforce design the most to be honest but the price point and set pack size really hurts that one compared to the Vario.
    Brandon likes this.
  5. I don't think you'll be disappointed with the float 32. I'm on year 3 with it and have no plans to change anytime soon. It's a nice pack for the price point. I do like the versatility of the Vario though.
    raynord22 likes this.
  6. raynord22

    raynord22

    Location:
    Sandpoint
    Here is the quiver that came out of this thread. Thanks again.
    image.jpeg
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  7. idsnowghost

    idsnowghost Staff Member

    Location:
    Spokane, WA
    $25 ABS canister/trigger exchanges here in Spokane: http://emilieritz.com/abs-cannisters/
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  8. raynord22

    raynord22

    Location:
    Sandpoint
    I went with the BCA Float 32 as it was only price I could handle after everything else. Thanks again everyone.
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  9. Hey have you gotten a chance to try these out yet? I'm currently in the same boat you seem to have been in. Can't decide between atomic backlands with radical 2.0 ft or salomon mtn lab with kingpins. I really really like the kingpin bindings and am pretty annoyed the backlands don't work with them. I also really like the mtn lab boots but am worried they wont provide enough ROM for comfortable touring and possibly be too heavy on long tours and climbs. Their downhill performance seems to be excellent from reviews but not much info on how they are on the up, or how they climb. Mind jiving in on your experience with them so far and what kind of terrain/trips you're tackling with this setup?
    raynord22 likes this.
  10. raynord22

    raynord22

    Location:
    Sandpoint
    Unfortunately I haven't been out on the MTB Lab/Kingpin yet, so I don't have much to offer. The Lab is a really cool boot and around the house the ROM felt good to me. I got a deal on the Kingpin and wanted the downhill experience to be similar to alpine so that is what pushed me to the Lab/Kingpin.
    I have a friend who purchased the Backland Carbon and says they feel like a hiking boot in walk mode (this seems to be the consensus of most reviews).
    I wish I could offer more but without a tour it's all just from research. Cy's post earlier in the thread I thought was a good breakdown of the difference between the two.
    cydwhit likes this.
  11. Hey Ivan, I can jump in with some shameless promotion again if you don't mind. Like I/Raynord said earlier, Backland and MTN lab are VERY different boots with very different purposes. If you are going hard enough to actually need kingpins (which in my opinion a lot of people who think they need kingpins aren't) then you just don't want to be in a boot like the Backland.

    This is a review of the MTN Lab from someone who goes harder both on the up and down than like 80% of people: http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/2015-2016-salomon-mtn-lab-2 His takeaway was that it's got plenty of ROM and is plenty light for most missions, and it freaking charges. I agree, people put a lot of stock in gram counting and ROM numbers without realizing that when they are touring they are only using a fraction of that ROM, you really only need that much ROM for heavy scrambling/mixed climbing stuff. I toured with Paul for two weeks this summer while he was testing the Backland and MTN Lab, he knows what he is talking about.

    Here's the same dude's take on the Backland: http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/atomic-backland-carbon-boot It's freaking light, walks very well, and skis ok. It's perfect for a radical setup but I just have no idea why anyone would want to stick it in the kingpin

    Final option, Solomon MTN Explore, sort of a middle ground. Kingpin compatible, skis very well, has a greater ROM and lighter weight than the MTN Lab. Probably a good choice for you: http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/2015-2016-salomon-mtn-explore-boot This boot should be getting more hype IMO it's a very good fit for a lot of people

    Honestly though, as far the weight savings/ROM stuff goes I'm not buying a lot of the industry hype. Most of us, myself included could stand to loose a few pounds by doing a bit more cardio and drinking a bit less beer, and that weight change is gonna make way more difference in the field than gram shaving on gear that's already crazy light, and potentially compromising performance. Hope that helped a little though!
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  12. Thanks for the intel. It looks like a really nice setup I'm pretty torn. That promise of near alpine performance on the down is really tempting. I've definitely heard the backlands are like hiking boots on the up (also why they are so tempting), just a little concerned about how they'll do on the down. Please let us know how your setup worked for you when you get them into the mountains.
    raynord22 likes this.
  13. Skisurge

    Skisurge

    Location:
    Spokane
    I have, I believe, the first or second pair of Vipecs sold by Mountain Gear. This is my third season in them. First season was problematic as the adjustable pin backed out mid tour--twice. First time was 200 yards up mt Spokane. Second time was at top of 4000 foot climb in Tetons. I found the pin when it fell in the snow and if not it would have been a long walk home.
    Diamir/Black Diamond fixed the problem and replaced the toe piece with a newly designed one that eliminates the problem. Now the only problem is they can be fiddly to get into the binding. I think I've passed the learning g curve and now get in right away 90% of the time. So really no downside now.
    The upside is significant, I think.
    Moat important, it has elasticity in lateral release at the toe, which in theory can protect your knee more like a frame binding and also should prevent pre-release. I've never come out of them, and once skiing I don't note a difference in down hill performance from frame bindings.

    The other good is you can remove your skins and transition from climb to ski mode without removing your skis. I had never done this till this week and it saved me a bunch of time on my transitions. I'm still the slowest transitioner in my group, but not because of bindings. The Vipec actually gives an advantage there.

    So I wouldn't avoid the Vipec. I would buy again.

    I would avoid frame bindings altogether.
    I bought a pair of Salomon Guardians as my first AT setup because I wanted to hit big kickers and land switch in the backcountry. Turns out I have no appetite for doing that when I'm a long hike away from help and exhausted from lugging that setup into the woods. Would be good in short side-country though.

    I used my Guardians about 4 times then took the plunge into tech bindings and would be happy to unload my Guardians because I don't see ever using them again--even though I have Quiver Killer inserts installed in my touring boards so I can switch bindings back and forth easily.

    Now using Vipecs and Dynafit TLT-6 boots with Rossignol Super 7s. Love those boots. Light as can be and not much of a compromise on the down hill at all when you put the tongue inserts it. Stiff as I'll ever want them. Absolutely changes the nature of the day in the backcountry. Skis are a little heavy -- but ski beautifully. I'd probably go lighter on skis.

    I have a separate full alpine setup for the resort and save my jibbing for there.
    raynord22 likes this.

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